CHAPTER 34-35


DAILY HOMEWORK

HOMEWORK FOR 3/18
The following students are responsible for covering, in depth, the following topic(s). Each of you will need to present the key info surrounding the Event or Battle of the European Theater. 
You should try and cover each of the 5W's & H
(as they apply)
LEFT OVER FROM 3/17
4. Invasion of Sicily (John)
5. Liberation of Paris - Liberation of Rome (Shayne)
6. Battle of the Bulge - Meeting at the Elbe (Billy)
7. Election of 1944 - War sentiment in US (Erick)
8. Battle of Berlin - Hitler Suicide (Shivani)
TOPICS FOR 3/18
1. Japanese successes (Philippines - Bataan Death March)(Owen)
2. Battle of Coral Sea - Battle of Midway - Japanese errors in 1942 - (Monica)
3. Battle of Guadalcanal - Island Hopping - Marianas Islands - (Mike)
4. Retaking the Philippines (Leyte Gulf) - Potsdam Conference - (John)
5. Battle of Iwo Jima and Battle of Okinowa - (Tatiana)
6. Decision to drop the Bomb - Japanese Surrenders - (Erick)
7. US Emergence in Post War World - Military and Economic Leader - (Shivani)

HOMEWORK FOR 3/17
The following students are responsible for covering, in depth, the following topic(s). Each of you will need to present the key info surrounding the Event or Battle of the European Theater. 
You should try and cover each of the 5W's & H
(as they apply)

1. Battle of the Atlantic - Technological Advances (Owen)
2. North Africa Campaign - Battle of El Alamein (Monica)
3. German invasion of Russia - Battle of Stalingrad  (Mike)
4. Casablanca Conference - Invasion of Sicily (John)
5. Tehran Conference - D-Day (Tatiana)
6. Liberation of Paris - Liberation of Rome (Shayne)
7. Battle of the Bulge - Meeting at the Elbe (Billy)
8. Election of 1944 - War sentiment in US (Erick)
9. Battle of Berlin - Hitler Suicide (Shivani)

** To conclude your discussion, provide a rational explanation as to why your topic was the most crucial of the European Theater.

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HOMEWORK FOR 3/16

Begin reading Chapter 35 pp. 821-832 - This section deals mainly with American efforts on the home-front, strategies for war and impacts of war on several groups of Americans 

- Answer Discussion Questions posted below:
1 - "America's task was far more complex and back-breaking [in WWII than in WWI." Explain.

2 - What effects did the war have on manufacturing, agriculture and labor?


3 - What effect did the war have on the nation's minorities?

- Be sure to answer the question with specific answers that have depth. 

=======================================

FOR EXAM 
Be sure to know 

1) The "Ins and Outs" of all the Isolationist  policies 
        - Specific actions/events
-Causes of decisions and policies
-Overall effects of decisions (+ or -) 
- Support and Opposition (groups) 
 
2)1) The "Ins and Outs" of all the Interventionist  policies 
        - Specific actions/events
-Causes of decisions and policies
-Overall effects of decisions (+ or -) 
- Support and Opposition (groups) 

3) Specific events that led to the transition from Isolationist to Internationalist 

4) Specific events and locations of attack by the 3 Axis powers/dictators (Europe and Asia)

5. Specific scenarios with America and Jewish refugees from Europe 

6) Election of 1940

=========================================

HOMEWORK FOR 3/11
Print out all materials needed for this Chapter 
Begin reading Chapter 34 (800-810, stopping at the Fall of France
Complete the corresponding questions and vocab on the C34 - READING GUIDE AND VOCAB

Since the reading is consolidated, please be fully prepared to discuss the major themes and content.
EACH DAY MUST BE PRODUCTIVE!!
==================================================
THE CENTURY: AMERICA'S TIME
"OVER THE EDGE"

YouTube Video

==========================================
THE CENTURY: AMERICA'S TIME
"HOME FRONT"

YouTube Video

==========================================
THE CENTURY: AMERICA'S TIME
"CIVILIANS AT WAR"

YouTube Video




CHAPTER SUMMARY

Chapter 34 Summary
Roosevelt’s early foreign policies, such as wrecking the London economic conference and establishing the Good Neighbor policy in Latin America, were governed by concern for domestic recovery and reflected Americas desire for a less active role in the world. America virtually withdrew from all European affairs, and promised independence to the Philippines as an attempt to avoid Asian commitments.
Depression-spawned chaos in Europe and Asia strengthened the isolationist impulse, as Congress passed a series of Neutrality Acts designed to prevent America from being drawn into foreign wars. The United States adhered to the policy for a time, despite the aggression of Italy, Germany, and Japan. But after the outbreak of World War II in Europe, Roosevelt began to provide some aid to the Allies.
After the fall of France, Roosevelt gave greater assistance to desperate Britain in the destroyers-for-bases deal and in lend-lease. Still-powerful isolationists protested these measures, but Wendall Willkie refrained from attacking Roosevelt’s foreign policy in the 1940 campaign.
Roosevelt and Winston Churchill issued the Atlantic Charter, and by the summer of 1941, the United States was fighting an undeclared naval war with Germany in the North Atlantic. After negotiations with Japan failed, the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor plunged the United States into World War II.

CHAPTER 34 - RESOURCE VIDEO

YouTube Video



CHAPTER 34 REVIEW Video

YouTube Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1WhuCDoCqc
===================================================

Chapter 35 Summary
America was wounded but roused to national unity by Pearl Harbor. Roosevelt settled on a fundamental strategy of dealing with Hitler first, while doing just enough in the Pacific to block the Japanese advance.
With the ugly exception of the Japanese-American concentration camps, World War II proceeded in the United States without the fanaticism and violations of civil liberties that occurred in World War I. The economy was effectively mobilized, using new sources of labor such as women and Mexican braceros.Numerous African Americans and Indians also left their traditional rural homelands and migrated to war-industry jobs in the cities of the North and West. The war brought full employment and prosperity, as well as enduring social changes, as millions of Americans were uprooted and thrown together in the military and in new communities across the country. Unlike European and Asian nations, however, the United States experienced relatively little economic and social devastation from the war.
The tide of Japanese conquest was stemmed at the Battles of Midway and the Coral Sea, and American forces then began a slow strategy of“island hopping” toward Tokyo. Allied troops first invaded North Africa and Italy in 1942–1943, providing a small, compromise “second front” that attempted to appease the badly weakened Soviet Union as well as the anxious British. The real second front came in June 1944 with the D-Day invasion of France. The Allies moved rapidly across France, but faced a setback in the Battle of the Bulge in the Low Countries.
Meanwhile, American capture of the Marianas Islands established the basis for extensive bombing of the Japanese home islands. Roosevelt won a fourth term as Allied troops entered Germany and finally met the Russians, bringing an end to Hitler’s rule in May 1945. After a last round of brutal warfare on Okinawa and Iwo Jima, the dropping of two atomic bombs ended the war against Japan in August 1945.

CHAPTER 35 - RESOURCE VIDEO

YouTube Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUvLR0RT6N4

CHAPTER 35 REVIEW Video

YouTube Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rytrFEoTuYk
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