CHAPTER 23 and 24


DAILY HOMEWORK 

Continuation of video from class today:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fVAB70rdqI&t=2319s

Next set of Presidents:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzTb3auoye8


FOR THE EXAM
You should know following information:

1.  All key information regarding Gilded Age Elections and Presidential Administrations
('68, '72, '76, '80, '84, '88, '92)
(Party Platforms, Issues that impacted election results, Key Facts about each election, Scandals - Labor and Social Issues - Money and Economic Issues, Key laws passed such as the Pendelton Act, Sherman Anti-Trust Act, Sherman Silver Purchase Act etc., Increasing role of Congress)

2.  Major developments and differences among Political Parties 
( Differences and Similarities between National Parties - Stalwarts and Half-Breeds - Rise and Fall of ALL 3rd Party Organizations - Platforms and Ideologies of Each esp. the Populists, causes and effects of huge Voter Turnout, Political Patronage, Views on the Tariff)

3. Significance of Labor Disputes in the 1880s and 1890s 
(Government and Social reactions to the disputes - Rise and Fall of Labor Organizations - Key Strategies used)

4. Key Economic developments
(Tariffs, Issues with farmers, Hard Money v Soft Money, Panic of 1873 and 1893)

- Issues with discrimination and racism against African Americans and Chinese Immigrants

The exam will consist of 40 content and 1 SAQ 
Use all available resources as you study for this exam
(FAILING TO PREPARE IS PREPARING TO FAIL)
==================================================

==========================================
ADDITIONAL VIDEO RESOURSES

YouTube Video

YouTube Video

YouTube Video

CHAPTER SUMMARY

Chapter 23 Summary

YouTube Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sem1R0g2BGg&list=UUVP_vzaHr-s9SZoCOJu3GHw

After the soaring ideals and tremendous sacrifices of the Civil War, the postCivil War era was generally one of disillusionment. Politicians from the White House to the courthouse were often surrounded by corruption and scandal, while the actual problems afflicting industrializing America festered beneath the surface.
The popular war hero Grant was a poor politician and his administration was rife with corruption. Despite occasional futile reform efforts, politics in the Gilded Age was monopolized by the two patronage-fattened parties, which competed vigorously for spoils while essentially agreeing on most national policies. Cultural differences, different constituencies, and deeply felt local issues fueled intense party competition and unprecedented voter participation. Periodic complaints by Mugwump reformers and soft-money advocates failed to make much of a dent on politics.
The deadlocked contested 1876 election led to the sectional Compromise of 1877, which put an end to Reconstruction. An oppressive system of tenant farming and racial supremacy and segregation was thereafter fastened on the South, enforced by sometimes lethal violence. Racial prejudice against Chinese immigrants was also linked with labor unrest in the 1870s and 1880s.
Garfields assassination by a disappointed office seeker spurred the beginnings of civil-service reform, which made politics more dependent on big business. Cleveland, the first Democratic president since the Civil War, made a lower tariff the first real issue in national politics for some time. But his mild reform efforts were eclipsed by a major economic depression that began in 1893, a crisis that deepened the growing outcry from suffering farmers and workers against a government and economic system that seemed biased toward big business and the wealthy.

CHAPTER 23 REVIEW VIDEO

YouTube Video


Chapter 24 Summary

YouTube Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opwP638KzD8

Aided by government subsidies and loans, the first transcontinental rail line was completed in 1869, soon followed by others. This rail network opened vast new markets and prompted industrial growth. The power and corruption of the railroads led to public demands for regulation, which was only minimally begun.
New technology and forms of business organization led to the growth of huge corporate trusts. Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller led the way in the steel and oil industries. Initially, the oil industry supplied kerosene for lamps; it eventually expanded by providing gasoline to fuel automobiles. Cheap steel transformed industries from construction to rail building, and the powerful railroads dominated the economy and reshaped American society.
The benefits of industrialization were unevenly distributed. The South remained in underdeveloped dependence, while the industrial working class struggled at the bottom of the growing class divisions of American society. Increasingly transformed from independent producers and farmers to dependent wage earners, Americas workers became vulnerable to illness, industrial accidents, and unemployment.
Workers attempts at labor organization were generally ineffective. The Knights of Labor disappeared after the Haymarket bombing. Gompers founded the AF of L to organize skilled craft laborers but ignored most industrial workers, women, and blacks.

CHAPTER 24 REVIEW VIDEO

YouTube Video




SelectionFile type iconFile nameDescriptionSizeRevisionTimeUser
ĉ
View Download
  29k v. 2 Dec 5, 2014, 9:40 AM Michael DeLucca
ć
View Download
  11405k v. 2 Dec 5, 2014, 9:41 AM Michael DeLucca
ĉ
View Download
  26k v. 2 Dec 16, 2014, 9:08 AM Michael DeLucca
ĉ
View Download
  18k v. 1 Dec 16, 2016, 9:51 AM Michael DeLucca
ć
View Download
  4138k v. 2 Jun 19, 2012, 6:02 AM Michael DeLucca
ć
View Download
  11935k v. 2 Jun 19, 2012, 6:03 AM Michael DeLucca
Comments