CHAPTER 16, 18 and 19

 DAILY HOMEWORK

FOR MONDAY 10/20
Print all necessary handouts for Chapter 16.
Begin reading the chapter pp. 350-359 (Stopping at Life Under the Lash). Complete all Vocab and Questions from the C16 - READING GUIDE AND VOCAB that apply to the reading. 

YouTube Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ajn9g5Gsv98
CHAPTER SUMMARY

Chapter 16 Summary
Whitneys cotton gin made cotton production enormously profitable, and created an ever-increasing demand for slave labor. The Souths dependence on cotton production tied it economically to the plantation system and racially to white supremacy. The cultural gentility and political domination of the relatively small plantation aristocracy concealed slaverys great social and economic costs for whites as well as blacks.
Most slaves were held by a few large planters. But most slaveowners had few slaves, and most southern whites had no slaves at all. Nevertheless, except for a few mountain whites, the majority of southern whites strongly supported slavery and racial supremacy because they cherished the hope of becoming slaveowners themselves, and because white racial identity gave them a sense of superiority to the blacks.
The treatment of the economically valuable slaves varied considerably. Within the bounds of the cruel system, slaves yearned for freedom and struggled to maintain their humanity, including family life.
The older black colonization movement was largely replaced in the 1830s by a radical Garrisonian abolitionism demanding an immediate end to slavery. Abolitionism and the Nat Turner rebellion caused a strong backlash in the South, which increasingly defended slavery as a positive good and turned its back on many of the liberal political and social ideas gaining strength in the North.
Most northerners were hostile to radical abolitionism, and respected the Constitutions evident protection of slavery where it existed. But many also gradually came to see the South as a land of oppression, and any attempt to extend slavery as a threat to free society.

CHAPTER 16 REVIEW VIDEO

YouTube Video

http://youtube.com/watch?v=jCMwzMqcuDI


Chapter 18 Summary
The acquisition of territory from Mexico created acute new dilemmas concerning the expansion of slavery, especially for the two major political parties, which had long tried to avoid the issue. The antislavery Free Soil party pushed the issue into the election of 1848. The application of gold-rich California for admission to the Union forced the controversy into the Senate, which engaged in stormy debates over slavery and the Union.
After the timely death of President Taylor, who had blocked a settlement, Congress resolved the crisis by passing the delicate Compromise of 1850. The compromise eased sectional tension for the moment, although the Fugitive Slave Law aroused opposition in the North.
As the Whig party died, the Democratic Pierce administration became the tool of proslavery expansionists. Controversies over Nicaragua, Cuba, and the Gadsden Purchase showed that expansionism was closely linked to the slavery issue.
The desire for a northern railroad route led Stephen Douglas to ram the Kansas-Nebraska Act through Congress in 1854. By repealing the Missouri Compromise and making new territory subject to popular sovereignty on slavery, this act aroused the fury of the North, sparked the rise of the Republican party, and set the stage for the Civil War.
CHAPTER 18 REVIEW VIDEO

YouTube Video

http://youtube.com/watch?v=CxxTn3_K1eQ


Chapter 19 Summary
The acquisition of territory from Mexico created acute new dilemmas concerning the expansion of slavery, especially for the two major political parties, which had long tried to avoid the issue. The antislavery Free Soil party pushed the issue into the election of 1848. The application of gold-rich California for admission to the Union forced the controversy into the Senate, which engaged in stormy debates over slavery and the Union.
After the timely death of President Taylor, who had blocked a settlement, Congress resolved the crisis by passing the delicate Compromise of 1850. The compromise eased sectional tension for the moment, although the Fugitive Slave Law aroused opposition in the North.
As the Whig party died, the Democratic Pierce administration became the tool of proslavery expansionists. Controversies over Nicaragua, Cuba, and the Gadsden Purchase showed that expansionism was closely linked to the slavery issue.
The desire for a northern railroad route led Stephen Douglas to ram the Kansas-Nebraska Act through Congress in 1854. By repealing the Missouri Compromise and making new territory subject to popular sovereignty on slavery, this act aroused the fury of the North, sparked the rise of the Republican party, and set the stage for the Civil War.

CHAPTER 19 REVIEW VIDEO

YouTube Video

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ZX63UeK5V1A
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